How to teach Stick Control 1 – Pegada Drum Method (Fundamentals to Intermediate)

How to teach Stick Control 1 – Pegada Drum Method (Fundamentals to Intermediate)


Stick Control 1, from Pegada Drum Method,
is the exercise that I like to use to introduce the metronome to my students, among other
very interesting reasons to teach and practice it. Like any other exercise, you can leave it
for a bit later, depending on the student. We will focus on rebound and time keeping;
and the student can practice endurance at home. What you see on the left hand side is two
bars with 8th snare notes; and two exercises underneath: eight notes per hand; or four
notes per hand. And on the right hand side is a table that
will guide teachers and students through three ways of using those exercises. First, alternate eight notes each hand on
the snare or practice pad, counting 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. I tick “Count 1 to 8” if the student repeats
that correctly a few times. Then repeat the exercise counting 1 and 2
and 3 and 4 and, summing up eight notes per hand. One day you’ll get to a speed where it will
be hard to play fast and count all notes. So drop the “end”, and while counting
1, 2, 3, 4, play two notes per beat. When the student does that correctly, I tick
“Count 1 to 4”. The first column on the left hand side of
the table reads “Half Notes”, and you see the number 160, which is the Bits Per
Minute I recommend students to start with, being 230BPM the fastest they’ll do this
exercise in the lesson. At 160BPM, play one note for every two metronome
clicks. It’s slow and easy, so you are doing this
to practice how to listen to the click, and also to practice the Whipping Motion. My videos are about how to use Pegada Drum
Method with your students. If you don’t know what Whipping Motion is,
search it on Youtube and you’ll find lots of videos explaining it. If your student is doing well, increase the
speed until you get to 230BPM. If not, write down the speed they need to
practice more. Either way, for this exercise I don’t bother
with switching hands after four notes. Now show them how the second column works. It says “Quarter Notes”, so we will play
one note per click, switching hands every eight notes. From 130BPM to 160BPM you still can count
from 1 to 8. In this case, I only tell them to switch hands
after four notes when they get to 160BPM. Usually I talk about the third column in their
next lesson. Because regardless of how the student performs
the Quarter Notes exercise for the first time, I’ll tell them to play Coordination 1 and
Coordination 2 with the metronome. I write down the speed they played both exercises,
and I tell them we’ll aim for 180BPM each exercise. The third column, where it reads “8th Notes
Subdivision”, is where I ask them to count from 1 to 4, and play that extra note, the
off-beat note, after each number they count. So at 80BPM it will be like this. Beginners rarely get to 120BPM in the same
lesson they learn these exercises. Usually they stop at around 90BPM at this
stage. And no matter what speed they stop at, I ask
them to play the exercise 2, switching hands after four notes. Again, it doesn’t matter how fast or slow
they are playing this exercise, I show them how it applies when we practice the Single
Stroke Roll. And it is common that we can increase the
speed already. And I tell them we’ll aim for 160BPM. The same group of exercises include a suggestion
to practice the feet the same way. I’ve never done this during the lessons,
but this is up to the teacher. The lessons will continue with the exercises
in the following pages, but I’ll make sure they play all previous exercises with the
metronome until they reach the following: – Coordination 1 at 180BPM
– Coordination 2 again at 180BPM (with exception of number 3 that is many. times “too hard”)
– And Single Stroke Roll at 160BPM, and later 80BPM playing four notes per beat. In the next video I’ll talk about the Quarter, Eighth and Sixteenth Notes exercise. It is fun, and it contains one exercise I
like to teach before the sixteenth Single Stroke Roll.

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